by Amire | November 29, 2021


People’s limited mobility in 2020, and for the greater part of 2021, has taken a toll on everyone’s physical, mental and emotional health. We all know how closely linked these are for our health and how they are essential to our overall wellness.

If you’ve been feeling tired and sluggish and gained unwanted kilograms, it might be time to take control of your health. Here are 10 easy ways to start improving your physical health today.

1. Start moving more

Exercise helps you burn more calories if you’re trying to lose weight and improves cardiovascular health. It also helps with stress relief and enhancing mental focus.

Intense exercise, in particular, facilitates the release of the feel-good hormones serotonin and dopamine. This is the primary reason why there’s such a thing as runner’s high or that euphoric feeling you experience after intense physical activity — whether it’s hiking, jogging, running, cycling or some form of high-intensity interval training (HIIT).

2. Get enough sleep

The importance of sleep for mental and physical recovery cannot be stressed enough. If you’ve been suffering from sleepless nights, some basic steps you can take to improve your quality of sleep include having a regular sleep schedule, staying off screens and relaxing about an hour prior to bedtime.

3. Hydrate

Water is essential to all bodily processes, including the excretion of toxins.

It may come as a surprise, but a lot of people forget to drink enough water. At work, you can keep a one-litre bottle of water at your desk to remind you to take regular sips. Also, listen to your body’s own signals, and drink whenever you feel thirsty.

4. Maintain a well-balanced, nutritious diet

With the high incidence of cardiovascular and other lifestyle-related diseases, it’s essential to stick to a healthy, balanced diet. Ideally, aim to consume lots of fresh vegetables, healthy sources of carbs (such as sweet potato, beans, peas, etc.), protein (e.g. nuts, seeds, eggs) and fats (like avocado, olive oil and fatty fish) and vitamin-packed fresh fruits.

5. Reduce your sugar intake

Indulging your sweet tooth all the time could lead to dental issues, unhealthy weight gain and diseases like diabetes. If you can, try to get your sugar fix from organic or natural sources like fruits and honey.

6. Step out into the sunshine

Aside from giving you the opportunity to breathe in fresh air, getting out of your home in the morning sunshine ensures you get your vitamin D. This vitamin plays a key role in boosting immunity and in the growth and maintenance of strong and healthy bones.

7. Engage in mentally stimulating activities

Read a book, solve a puzzle or play a video game to challenge your brain. Regular mental stimulation will keep your brain alert and sharp and can possibly stave off cognitive decline.

8. Go for regular preventive exams

Going to the dentist twice a year, getting your eyes checked and scheduling annual physical and gynaecological (for women) exams work as preventive measures against disease. Actually knowing you are healthy is a lot better than simply assuming you are, especially if certain diseases run in your family.

9. Wash your hands

In the age of COVID, it’s especially important to practise proper hand hygiene. Keeping our hands clean is one of the most effective ways of preventing the spread of harmful pathogens.

10. Keep stress in check

When stress rules your life, it can manifest in different ways. You could lose your appetite, sleep poorly or even get sick.

Practising self-care and relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing exercises and meditation, can help you manage stress and deal with it more effectively. So, take time out from your day — even just an hour or so — to focus on yourself.

At Stride, our range of mental health services offers you specialist support, practical advice and someone to talk to.

If you wish to know more about how we can help you achieve your wellness goals, please contact us today.


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